October 27-29, 2019 | Wichita Marriott Hotel
Putting the Unity in Community
Putting the Unity in Community

Day 3 – October 29, 2019

7:15a.m.  Breakfast

Plenary Ballroom A-F

7:45-8:45a.m.  Breakfast Plenary                                             

"Old School Meets New School" Trends And Changing Conversation

Speakers: Brian Frederick, Brian Frederick, Neel Hajra & Angela Muller

*This breakfast plenary is supported by the CF Express Training

Historically, community foundation chief executives have tended to remain in their position for a long time and it wasn’t uncommon for many of the iconic names to have measured their tenure in decades and not years. The retirement of baby boomers has led to dramatic changes in the community foundation field and with influx of leaders bringing cross-sector fertilization and new ideas. During this session we’ll explore what the field has lost and gained through the perspectives of a panel of community foundation leaders who represent old school and new school community philanthropy.

8:45-9:15a.m.  Networking Break-Resources Hall

9:15-10:15a.m.  Session 5 

5.1 Uncorking New Capital: Aligning Mission and Capital Through Impact Investing

Intermediate/Advanced

Corporate Hills Ballroom

Speakers: Erin Egan & Lily Trager

Track: Asset Development/Sustainability

Ambassador: Angie Tatro

*This session is supported by Morgan Stanley; and UNICEF

Two outstanding leaders, representing the world-renowned Morgan Stanley Wealth Management Group and the children’s humanitarian organization, UNICEF USA, will connect regional donor resources to large-scale impact with global reach. They will illustrate how to mobilize all forms of capital for positive social impact and provide case studies of impact investing opportunities in which rural, small urban, and suburban community foundations can invest. 

5.2 Building Community in Trying Times: Tools for Bringing People Together When Forces are Pulling Them Apart

Basic

Atrium Room

Speakers: Conny Bogaard, Kristen Cambell & Rob Karwath

Track: Public Policy/Advocacy

Ambassador: Andrea Judd

These days, building community and bringing people together feels like swimming upstream--if you even want to dive in. But at a time when so many forces are pulling people and places apart, it's more important than ever for community leaders to bring people and places together to address issues. The rapid and increasing pace of change makes these constructive conversations imperative. The shelf life on any solution is shorter now than ever--and growing more so with technology's advance. That means communities must repeatedly come together to find new solutions, even when doing so feels impossible. Communities that do this will become the places that attract respect, talent and capital. In this session, you will hear from experts who have worked with communities nationwide to bridge gaps--and sometimes chasms--to grow civic engagement and find solutions they didn't know they had within them. How did they do it? A big part of success was avoiding traps of language, incivility and preconceived notions, finding themselves in community--and committing to stay there.

5.3 It Takes Two to Tango: When to Lead and When to Follow

Rural

Salon 1-2

Speakers: Joseph Sorenson & Jennifer Tolle Whiteside

Track: Legal

Ambassador: Marci Penner

The partnership between affiliate and host foundations can provide value to both parties but does not come without challenges. Session attendees will discuss roles and responsibilities, host foundation service models, and how affiliates can leverage their host relationship for the benefit of their community. We will also explore how to manage through difficult times and what options may be available for both parties to step away.

5.4 Tell Your Story with Improved Photos & Video

Basic

Room DE

Speaker: Ben Tierney

Track: Communications/Marketing

Ambassador: Loni Heinen

We all know that quality photos and telling our stories through imagery is incredibly important when trying to attract new donors, volunteers and supporters. But photographers are expensive, videographers are even more expensive, and all I really have is this smartphone camera... In this session, we'll look at different tools and software geared toward helping novices and pros alike improve their photography and video skills. We'll cover everything from how best to snap a photo of a group of people holding a check (we've all done it) to why the audio in your videos doesn't sound the best and what to do about it. You'll learn when it might be appropriate to hire a photographer versus when you can do it yourself. In addition to handling marketing for a Michigan-based community foundation, Ben Tierney has been a professional photographer for 7 years, shooting weddings, real estate, and images for a weekly online magazine. He uses those skills at the community foundation and will share several ideas on how to improve your visual storytelling on a budget.

5.5 Community Development Leadership by Community Foundations

Rural

Room AB

Speakers: Sally Cross & Becky Nickel

Track: Leadership

Ambassador: Tara Vance

Communities can be thought of as living breathing entities that follow a natural life cycle. In communities across the country there are examples of key community assets being saved or restored and others that use renewal for revitalizing a community. Opportunity Zones are new community development tool created in the Trump tax bill. Community foundations around the country are struggling with how to use this program to build real community wealth rather than create displacement through gentrification.

5.6 How to Help Your Employees Keep the Best Jobs They'll Ever Have

Idea Lab

Room F

Speaker: Kevin Murphy

Track: Finance/Operations

Ambassador: Megan Barber Allende

Working at a community foundation is a rare privilege. Our teams get to work with donors committing extraordinary acts of generosity and philanthropy. They work every day on projects that will improve the quality of life in their community, touch the lives of others and take pride in the results they generate. Still, those employees have needs, both economic and psychic, that need to be met to retain them as employees. This session will explore how community foundations can unleash the full range of assets they have to improve employee retention and morale. It will be a fun, interactive and energizing session of sharing with peers and creating new ideas.

5.7 Love Your Logic Model: One Foundation’s Journey in Impact Measurement

Intermediate/Advanced

Sedgwick

Speakers: Stephanie Hyre & Matt Shepherd

Track: Program

Ambassador: Rosemary Dorsa

We all know that a foundation is only as impactful as its grantees. But how can grantmakers help their nonprofit partners measure the success of their programs? How can we use the data they collect to inform our own outcome measurement processes? How do we learn from their data as opposed to storing it where it will never see the light of day again? In this interactive session, participants will learn about one foundation’s experience in using logic models in its organization-level impact assessment and grantee-level evaluation. In 2016, The Greater Kanawha Valley Foundation (TGKVF) implemented a logic model into its discretionary application process. Since then, TGKVF has operationalized its community wealth mission, overlaid the logic model on that framework, aggregated grantee data through reports, and now uses that data to assess their impact as a foundation. How did they do it? To find out, join Dr. Matthew Shepherd, founder of Midwest Evaluation and Research (MER) and Stephanie Hyre, Senior Program Officer at The Greater Kanawha Valley Foundation (TGKVF)! Learning outcomes include:

  • Identify a logic model's key components
  • Understand the importance of an organizational-level logic model
  • Differentiate both outcomes and outputs at funder and grantee levels
  • Learn how to aggregate data across diverse programs
  • Understand how logic models can drive performance and build capacity
  • Develop a customized logic model using your own organization's desired outcomes

5.8 Peer Expert Consultations (Sign Up at Registration Desk)

All levels

Sign up for a one-on-one session with one of your community foundation peers to discuss individual questions related to your foundation and its operations.

Arkansas

Robin Ferriby

Steve Joul

5.9 The Lawyer Is In: Legal Consultations (Sign Up At Registration Desk)

All levels

Executive Board Room

*Legal Consultations are supported by the Council on Foundations

Sign up for a one-on-one session with Bryan del Rosario or Christina Gonzalez to discuss individual legal questions related to your foundation and its operations. 

10:15 -10:30p.m.  Break 

10:30-11:30p.m.  Session 6

6.1 Tax Law for Those Who Aren't CPAs or Lawyers

Basic

Corporate Hills Ballroom

Speakers: Robin Ferriby, Christina Gonzalez & Bryan del Rosario

Track: Legal

Ambassador: Holly Rooks

*This session is supported by the Council on Foundations

This session will cover a wide range of legal matters which will help you secure and manage new gifts and assets for your community foundation for the benefit of the areas you serve. The session will include updates on Federal tax law affecting community foundations and charitable giving, regulatory considerations with respect to donor advised funds, opportunity zones developments, and supporting organizations. Time will be allocated for discussion of topics suggested by the participants.

6.2 How Funders with Little Cash But Lots of Assets Can Make a Difference in Rural America!

Rural

Atrium Room

Speaker: Allen Smart

Track: Public Policy/Advocacy

Ambassador: Becky Jeppesen

The session will explore some tactical on-the-ground methods that funders can employ to extend their influence and reach in service to their rural communities. Threaded through the interactive discussion will be a focus on some of the critical issues of the day in rural America where funders can be particularly useful.

6.3 It's Not "Different This Time." Getting Your Foundation Prepared for the Coming Economic Downturn

Intermediate/Advanced

Salon 1-2

Speaker: Kevin Murphy

Track: Governance

Ambassador: Tim Beaton 

At least as of the date that this was written, America was in a period of economic expansion that was poised to be the longest in history. Economic tailwinds make life in the community foundation business a little easier. But downturns are an inevitable part of the economic cycle and can begin at anytime. This is as good a time as any to begin planning for an economic downturn. In this session, you will participate in a guided brainstorming session with colleagues--including some who have been through prior recessions--to identify actions you can take now, and in the future, to help both your foundation and your community better weather the storm.

6.4 Community Leadership for Community Economic Impact – Embracing Your Role in Economic Development

Idea Lab

Room DE

Speakers: Deb Markley & Janet Topolsky

Track: Leadership

Ambassador: Janet Topolsky 

Community leadership by community foundations requires that you align all your resources to address the most critical community issues. In many places, these critical issues are tied to creating an economy that works well for everyone. In this session, we’ll share stories of foundations that are directing their community leadership efforts toward doing economic development differently with a range of community partners. We’ll identify some important “next steps” you can take to become a more community-impact driven foundation and suggest ways that you can invite donors to join you in the process.

6.5 Metrics and Models for Measuring Community Impact

Intermediate/Advanced

Room AB

Speakers: Laurie Paarlberg, Matt Shepherd & Norm Walzer

Track: Program

Ambassador: Andrea Judd 

*This session is supported by Midwest Evaluation Group

When community foundations are asked how they assess their community impact (outcomes), most will describe what they do to achieve impact (outputs). Understanding and quantifying the impact of community foundations that work in multiple topical areas, with multiple partners and grantees, can be a daunting task. This session will allow the audience to hear from three experts, Matthew Shepherd, Ph.D.; Laurie Ellen Paarlberg, Ph.D.; and Norman Walzer, Ph.D., who have begun to address this challenge. The session will cover the topics of 1) the process of creating a community dashboard of indicators to track community-level change over time, 2) collaborative measurement tools (re: collective impact), and 3) ways to improve outcomes by working with grantees to prepare them for funded activities and the useful role of technical assistance. Attendees will learn possible strategies they can explore and employ to begin to understand the impact their activities have in the communities with which they work.

6.6 Are Hedge Funds and Private Equity Necessary for Your Portfolio? The Answer May Surprise You

Intermediate/Advanced

Room F

Speaker: Will Thorpe

Track: Finance/Operations

Ambassador: Bekki Pribil 

As community foundations consider the best and most efficient ways in which to manage their portfolios, should they consider challenging the widely held belief that sophisticated endowment investing requires illiquid assets? In this session, speakers will discuss the merits of using illiquid alternative assets such as hedge funds and private equity in endowment portfolios. While the use of hedge funds and private equity is seen by many as a necessary element of any endowment portfolio, some research suggests that these investments may not produce the promised results. The experience at many conferences includes presentations on “how much” of an endowment portfolio should be invested in illiquid assets vs. “should” an endowment invest in illiquid assets at all. While some illiquid investments produce stellar returns, other sometimes overlooked liquid asset classes may provide equal or better results. 

6.7 Peer Expert Consultations (Sign Up at Registration Desk)

All levels

Sign up for a one-on-one session with one of your community foundation peers to discuss individual questions related to your foundation and its operations. 

Sedgwick

Bonnie Gettys 

Arkansas

David Bennett

Sara Carlson 

11:30-11:45p.m.  Break 

11:45-1:00p.m.  Closing Plenary Lunch

Plenary Ballroom A-F

Will We Make A Difference? We Must!

Speaker: Tim Penny

*This plenary lunch is supported by the Dane G. Hansen Foundation; and Ekstrom Alley Clontz & Associates 

As community foundation work has evolved so have the questions asked by foundation leaders. In the old paradigm, “How big are we?” and “How much are we growing?” were the key questions and farther down the list of priorities, “Are we making a difference?” Today’s leaders want to ensure that we are making an impact. As a former Minnesota state Senator and U.S. Congressman, Tim Penny has seen firsthand the limitations of government at building healthy sustainable communities and sees community foundations as an integral part of the set of players who are collaboratively driving success. Equipped with a rural culture of collaboration and support, his foundation is working with several communities with a focus on building on the Foundation’s long history of asset-based community development, centering on helping communities develop long-term strategies and tools to bolster and sustain entrepreneurial activity. Are we making a difference? We are and we must continue. 

1:00p.m.  Adjourn